Cameron Mackintosh presents the acclaimed production of Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg’s Tony Award-winning musical phenomenon, Les Misérables at the Fisher Theater, December 20 – January 8, 2023.


Haley Dortch plays Fantine. Photo provided by Broadway in Detroit

Set against the backdrop of 19th century France, Les Misérables tells an enthralling story of broken dreams and unrequited love, passion, sacrifice and redemption–a timeless testament to the survival of the human spirit. This epic and uplifting story has become one of the most celebrated musicals in theatrical history. Michigan’s own Haley Dortch portrays Fantine who make her national tour debut as Fantine. Currently a student at the University of Michigan, Dortch spooke to BLAC about being one of few black faces on stage. “There was a time when I was in school that I’d thought about giving this up. It was around the time of George Floyd and Breana Taylor and all of that civil unrest,” remembers Dortch. “I’d thought that things were never going to change from being the disparities first hand. Then I said, I had to be apart of that change in order to see it. And as you can see, I’ve continued in this industry.”


Photo provided by Broadway in Detroit

The French Revolution

This musical play takes in Paris in the early 19th century from 1815-1823. This is a period right after the French Revolution. That put an end to the French monarchy, feudalism and took away political power away from the Catholic Church. During this period of time there were civil unrest and new ideals of social justice. This play depicts the trials and tribulations of the social classes and civil unrest during this transition of political power in Paris. Nothing is left out it covers love, romance, deception, death, sacrifice, blackmail, friendship, and honor. 

Photo provided by Broadway in Detroit

The setting of the stage was remarkable very well done; it covered a war-torn country with artifacts of early 19th century France. Smooth transition of scenes throughout the production and stunning optical illusions. The settings covered every social class from the homes and gardens of the upper class to the slums and tunnels of the serfs. It even shown the French country side after the devastation of war. The musical was almost nonstop, and it told a very compelling story. There were times when there were solos and duo performances which were exceptional and the crowd just gave stunning applauses each time. A young actor portrayed great talent with his singing and acting was tragically killed fighting for social justice in a war scene. 

Photo provided by Broadway in Detroit

The costumes displayed an authentic look from 19th century France. They seem very detailed and very well tailored it actually gave you that feel that you went back in time. The colors on the set display a very patriotic France of color blue, white and red during different war scenes and conflicts.

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This review was contributed by BLAC contributor, Mark A. Grier.

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